Book of romeo and julia

book of romeo and julia

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Christopher Marlowe 's Hero and Leander and Dido, Queen of Carthage , both similar stories written in Shakespeare's day, are thought to be less of a direct influence, although they may have helped create an atmosphere in which tragic love stories could thrive.

It is unknown when exactly Shakespeare wrote Romeo and Juliet. Juliet's nurse refers to an earthquake she says occurred 11 years ago.

Other earthquakes—both in England and in Verona—have been proposed in support of the different dates. Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet was published in two quarto editions prior to the publication of the First Folio of These are referred to as Q1 and Q2.

The first printed edition, Q1, appeared in early , printed by John Danter. Because its text contains numerous differences from the later editions, it is labelled a so-called ' bad quarto '; the 20th-century editor T.

Spencer described it as "a detestable text, probably a reconstruction of the play from the imperfect memories of one or two of the actors", suggesting that it had been pirated for publication.

Alternative theories are that some or all of 'the bad quartos' are early versions by Shakespeare or abbreviations made either for Shakespeare's company or for other companies.

It was printed in by Thomas Creede and published by Cuthbert Burby. Q2 is about lines longer than Q1. Scholars believe that Q2 was based on Shakespeare's pre-performance draft called his foul papers since there are textual oddities such as variable tags for characters and "false starts" for speeches that were presumably struck through by the author but erroneously preserved by the typesetter.

It is a much more complete and reliable text and was reprinted in Q3 , Q4 and Q5. The First Folio text of was based primarily on Q3, with clarifications and corrections possibly coming from a theatrical prompt book or Q1.

Pope began a tradition of editing the play to add information such as stage directions missing in Q2 by locating them in Q1.

This tradition continued late into the Romantic period. Fully annotated editions first appeared in the Victorian period and continue to be produced today, printing the text of the play with footnotes describing the sources and culture behind the play.

Scholars have found it extremely difficult to assign one specific, overarching theme to the play.

Proposals for a main theme include a discovery by the characters that human beings are neither wholly good nor wholly evil, but instead are more or less alike, [35] awaking out of a dream and into reality, the danger of hasty action, or the power of tragic fate.

None of these have widespread support. However, even if an overall theme cannot be found it is clear that the play is full of several small, thematic elements that intertwine in complex ways.

Several of those most often debated by scholars are discussed below. My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.

Juliet Good pilgrim, you do wrong your hand too much, Which mannerly devotion shows in this; For saints have hands that pilgrims' hands do touch, And palm to palm is holy palmers' kiss.

Romeo and Juliet is sometimes considered to have no unifying theme, save that of young love. Since it is such an obvious subject of the play, several scholars have explored the language and historical context behind the romance of the play.

On their first meeting, Romeo and Juliet use a form of communication recommended by many etiquette authors in Shakespeare's day: By using metaphors of saints and sins, Romeo was able to test Juliet's feelings for him in a non-threatening way.

This method was recommended by Baldassare Castiglione whose works had been translated into English by this time. He pointed out that if a man used a metaphor as an invitation, the woman could pretend she did not understand him, and he could retreat without losing honour.

Juliet, however, participates in the metaphor and expands on it. The religious metaphors of "shrine", "pilgrim", and "saint" were fashionable in the poetry of the time and more likely to be understood as romantic rather than blasphemous, as the concept of sainthood was associated with the Catholicism of an earlier age.

Brooke's Romeus and Juliet. In the later balcony scene, Shakespeare has Romeo overhear Juliet's soliloquy, but in Brooke's version of the story, her declaration is done alone.

By bringing Romeo into the scene to eavesdrop, Shakespeare breaks from the normal sequence of courtship.

Usually, a woman was required to be modest and shy to make sure that her suitor was sincere, but breaking this rule serves to speed along the plot.

The lovers are able to skip courting and move on to plain talk about their relationship— agreeing to be married after knowing each other for only one night.

Romeo and Juliet's love seems to be expressing the "Religion of Love" view rather than the Catholic view. Another point is that although their love is passionate, it is only consummated in marriage, which keeps them from losing the audience's sympathy.

The play arguably equates love and sex with death. Throughout the story, both Romeo and Juliet, along with the other characters, fantasise about it as a dark being , often equating it with a lover.

Capulet, for example, when he first discovers Juliet's faked death, describes it as having deflowered his daughter.

Right before her suicide, she grabs Romeo's dagger, saying "O happy dagger! This is thy sheath. There rust, and let me die. Scholars are divided on the role of fate in the play.

No consensus exists on whether the characters are truly fated to die together or whether the events take place by a series of unlucky chances.

Arguments in favour of fate often refer to the description of the lovers as " star-cross'd ". This phrase seems to hint that the stars have predetermined the lovers' future.

Draper points out the parallels between the Elizabethan belief in the four humours and the main characters of the play for example, Tybalt as a choleric.

Interpreting the text in the light of humours reduces the amount of plot attributed to chance by modern audiences.

For example, Romeo's challenging Tybalt is not impulsive; it is, after Mercutio's death, the expected action to take.

In this scene, Nevo reads Romeo as being aware of the dangers of flouting social norms , identity, and commitments. He makes the choice to kill, not because of a tragic flaw , but because of circumstance.

O heavy lightness, serious vanity, Misshapen chaos of well-seeming forms, Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health, Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!

Scholars have long noted Shakespeare's widespread use of light and dark imagery throughout the play. Caroline Spurgeon considers the theme of light as "symbolic of the natural beauty of young love" and later critics have expanded on this interpretation.

Romeo describes Juliet as being like the sun, [51] brighter than a torch, [52] a jewel sparkling in the night, [53] and a bright angel among dark clouds.

For example, Romeo and Juliet's love is a light in the midst of the darkness of the hate around them, but all of their activity together is done in night and darkness while all of the feuding is done in broad daylight.

This paradox of imagery adds atmosphere to the moral dilemma facing the two lovers: At the end of the story, when the morning is gloomy and the sun hiding its face for sorrow, light and dark have returned to their proper places, the outward darkness reflecting the true, inner darkness of the family feud out of sorrow for the lovers.

All characters now recognise their folly in light of recent events, and things return to the natural order, thanks to the love and death of Romeo and Juliet.

Time plays an important role in the language and plot of the play. Both Romeo and Juliet struggle to maintain an imaginary world void of time in the face of the harsh realities that surround them.

Stars were thought to control the fates of humanity, and as time passed, stars would move along their course in the sky, also charting the course of human lives below.

Romeo speaks of a foreboding he feels in the stars' movements early in the play, and when he learns of Juliet's death, he defies the stars' course for him.

Another central theme is haste: Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet spans a period of four to six days, in contrast to Brooke's poem's spanning nine months.

Thomas Tanselle believe that time was "especially important to Shakespeare" in this play, as he used references to "short-time" for the young lovers as opposed to references to "long-time" for the "older generation" to highlight "a headlong rush towards doom".

In the end, the only way they seem to defeat time is through a death that makes them immortal through art. Time is also connected to the theme of light and dark.

In Shakespeare's day, plays were most often performed at noon or in the afternoon in broad daylight.

Shakespeare uses references to the night and day, the stars, the moon, and the sun to create this illusion. He also has characters frequently refer to days of the week and specific hours to help the audience understand that time has passed in the story.

All in all, no fewer than references to time are found in the play, adding to the illusion of its passage. The earliest known critic of the play was diarist Samuel Pepys , who wrote in Publisher Nicholas Rowe was the first critic to ponder the theme of the play, which he saw as the just punishment of the two feuding families.

In mid-century, writer Charles Gildon and philosopher Lord Kames argued that the play was a failure in that it did not follow the classical rules of drama: Writer and critic Samuel Johnson , however, considered it one of Shakespeare's "most pleasing" plays.

In the later part of the 18th and through the 19th century, criticism centred on debates over the moral message of the play. Actor and playwright David Garrick 's adaptation excluded Rosaline: Romeo abandoning her for Juliet was seen as fickle and reckless.

Critics such as Charles Dibdin argued that Rosaline had been purposely included in the play to show how reckless the hero was and that this was the reason for his tragic end.

Others argued that Friar Laurence might be Shakespeare's spokesman in his warnings against undue haste.

With the advent of the 20th century, these moral arguments were disputed by critics such as Richard Green Moulton: In Romeo and Juliet , Shakespeare employs several dramatic techniques that have garnered praise from critics; most notably the abrupt shifts from comedy to tragedy an example is the punning exchange between Benvolio and Mercutio just before Tybalt arrives.

Before Mercutio's death in Act three, the play is largely a comedy. When Romeo is banished, rather than executed, and Friar Laurence offers Juliet a plan to reunite her with Romeo, the audience can still hope that all will end well.

They are in a "breathless state of suspense" by the opening of the last scene in the tomb: If Romeo is delayed long enough for the Friar to arrive, he and Juliet may yet be saved.

Shakespeare also uses sub-plots to offer a clearer view of the actions of the main characters. For example, when the play begins, Romeo is in love with Rosaline, who has refused all of his advances.

Romeo's infatuation with her stands in obvious contrast to his later love for Juliet. This provides a comparison through which the audience can see the seriousness of Romeo and Juliet's love and marriage.

Paris' love for Juliet also sets up a contrast between Juliet's feelings for him and her feelings for Romeo.

The formal language she uses around Paris, as well as the way she talks about him to her Nurse, show that her feelings clearly lie with Romeo.

Beyond this, the sub-plot of the Montague—Capulet feud overarches the whole play, providing an atmosphere of hate that is the main contributor to the play's tragic end.

Shakespeare uses a variety of poetic forms throughout the play. He begins with a line prologue in the form of a Shakespearean sonnet , spoken by a Chorus.

Most of Romeo and Juliet is, however, written in blank verse , and much of it in strict iambic pentameter , with less rhythmic variation than in most of Shakespeare's later plays.

Friar Laurence, for example, uses sermon and sententiae forms and the Nurse uses a unique blank verse form that closely matches colloquial speech.

For example, when Romeo talks about Rosaline earlier in the play, he attempts to use the Petrarchan sonnet form. Petrarchan sonnets were often used by men to exaggerate the beauty of women who were impossible for them to attain, as in Romeo's situation with Rosaline.

Early psychoanalytic critics saw the problem of Romeo and Juliet in terms of Romeo's impulsiveness, deriving from "ill-controlled, partially disguised aggression", [83] which leads both to Mercutio's death and to the double suicide.

That hatred manifests itself directly in the lovers' language: Juliet, for example, speaks of "my only love sprung from my only hate" [88] and often expresses her passion through an anticipation of Romeo's death.

Feminist literary critics argue that the blame for the family feud lies in Verona's patriarchal society. When Tybalt kills Mercutio, Romeo shifts into this violent mode, regretting that Juliet has made him so "effeminate".

The feud is also linked to male virility, as the numerous jokes about maidenheads aptly demonstrate. Other critics, such as Dympna Callaghan, look at the play's feminism from a historicist angle, stressing that when the play was written the feudal order was being challenged by increasingly centralised government and the advent of capitalism.

At the same time, emerging Puritan ideas about marriage were less concerned with the "evils of female sexuality" than those of earlier eras and more sympathetic towards love-matches: A number of critics have found the character of Mercutio to have unacknowledged homoerotic desire for Romeo.

As Benvolio argues, she is best replaced by someone who will reciprocate. Shakespeare's procreation sonnets describe another young man who, like Romeo, is having trouble creating offspring and who may be seen as being a homosexual.

Goldberg believes that Shakespeare may have used Rosaline as a way to express homosexual problems of procreation in an acceptable way. In this view, when Juliet says " The balcony scene was introduced by Da Porto in He had Romeo walk frequently by her house, "sometimes climbing to her chamber window" and wrote, "It happened one night, as love ordained, when the moon shone unusually bright, that whilst Romeo was climbing the balcony, the young lady A few decades later, Bandello greatly expanded this scene, diverging from the familiar one: Julia has her nurse deliver a letter asking Romeo to come to her window with a rope ladder, and he climbs the balcony with the help of his servant, Julia and the nurse the servants discreetly withdraw after this.

Nevertheless, in October , Lois Leveen speculated in The Atlantic that the original Shakespeare play did not contain a balcony.

Leveen suggested that during the 18th century, David Garrick chose to use a balcony in his adaptation and revival of Romeo and Juliet and modern adaptations have continued this tradition.

Romeo and Juliet ranks with Hamlet as one of Shakespeare's most performed plays. Its many adaptations have made it one of his most enduring and famous stories.

Scholar Gary Taylor measures it as the sixth most popular of Shakespeare's plays, in the period after the death of Christopher Marlowe and Thomas Kyd but before the ascendancy of Ben Jonson during which Shakespeare was London's dominant playwright.

The First Quarto, printed in , says that "it hath been often and with great applause plaid publiquely", setting the first performance before that date.

The Lord Chamberlain's Men were certainly the first to perform it. Besides their strong connections with Shakespeare, the Second Quarto actually names one of its actors, Will Kemp , instead of Peter, in a line in Act Five.

Richard Burbage was probably the first Romeo, being the company's actor, and Master Robert Goffe a boy the first Juliet. All theatres were closed down by the puritan government on 6 September Upon the restoration of the monarchy in , two patent companies the King's Company and the Duke's Company were established, and the existing theatrical repertoire divided between them.

This was a tragicomedy by James Howard, in which the two lovers survive. Otway's version was a hit, and was acted for the next seventy years.

Theophilus Cibber 's adaptation of , and David Garrick 's of both used variations on it. For example, Garrick's version transferred all language describing Rosaline to Juliet, to heighten the idea of faithfulness and downplay the love-at-first-sight theme.

The earliest known production in North America was an amateur one: Garrick's altered version of the play was very popular, and ran for nearly a century.

Aug 27, Nate rated it did not like it. Her father states she "hath not yet seen the change of fourteen years" in 1. Even in Shakespeare's England, most women were at least 21 before they married and had children.

It's not clear how old Romeo is, but either he's also a stupid little kid who needs to be slapped, or he's a child molester, and neither one is a good thing.

When I was in middle school or high school, around the time we read this book, I remember a classmate saying in class that when her and her boyfriends' eyes met across the quad, they just knew they were meant to be together forever.

How convenient that her soulmate happened to be an immensely popular and good-looking football player, and his soulmate happened to be a gorgeous cheerleader!

That's not love at first sight, that's lust at first sight. If they were really lucky, maybe as time went on they would also happen to "click" very well, that lust would develop into love it didn't , and they would end up together forever they didn't.

But if they saw each other at a school dance, decided they were "like, totally in love," and then the next day decided to run off and get married, we shouldn't encourage that as a romantic love story, we should slap the hell out of them both to wake them up to reality.

For what it's worth, my cynicism doesn't come from any bitterness towards life or love. I met my wife when we were 17, and we've now been together almost 10 years, married for a little over 2.

Fortunately for me, she turned out to be awesome. If we had decided the day after meeting each other that we were hopelessly in love and needed to get married immediately, we would have been idiots, and I hope someone who I trusted and respected would have slapped me, hard.

If we were 13 at the time, that would be even worse. Enlightened adults injecting this into our youth as a classic love story for the generations, providing further support for their angst-filled false ideas of love and marriage, is probably worst of all.

View all 81 comments. Nov 15, Anne rated it really liked it Shelves: This is what happens when you jump into a Rebound Relationship.

So, when the story opens, Romeo is desperately in love with Rosaline. But since she won't give up the booty has sworn to remain chaste, he's all depressed and heartbroken.

He takes her words to heart, and her lyrics begin to mend his broken soul. His boys drag his sad ass to a party, and across a crowded room, Romeo spies his next victim Meet 13 year old Juliet.

And how old is Romeo? Well, he's old enough to kill Juliet's cousin in a sword fight, so But since he's such a punk little pussy - what with the whining, sobbing, and spouting off crap poetry - I'm going to assume he's not much older than she is and say 15 or If I'm wrong, don't correct me.

It'll help me sleep tonight. Their families have been feuding over a McCoy pig that was killed during a Hatfield moonshine run decades ago. Needless to say, tensions are still running high.

They gotta keep their love on the down low. And it is love, dammit! I mean, they've stared at each other a whole bunch, and had, like , two conversations.

This time around, Romeo isn't going to make the same mistake as before, and let the new girl of his dreams slip through his fingers Time to get married!

Because marriage will solve all your problems. And we all know what happened next, right?! You know, I can't help but wonder what that first encounter would've been like if they'd met when they were older?

Hey baby, Heaven must be missing an angel. Mind if I crawl up to your balcony tonight? And a pretty funny one at that!

I originally gave it 3 stars, but I had to bump it up for making me giggle so much. I listened to this on Playaway, so I got to have the audio version with a full cast of characters, sound effects, and music.

Totally recommend going this way if you're planning on trying out Shakespeare. May 12, Bill Kerwin rated it it was amazing Shelves: Two things struck me during this re-reading: Shakespeare would create many other such characters, but these three are the first.

View all 27 comments. May 18, Catriona rated it it was amazing. The people who dislike this play are the ones who view common sense over being rational, and prefer to view the world in a structured way.

One of the main arguments that come across is the 'meeting, falling in love, and dying all in a weekend when Juliet is but 13'.

We all must die in the end, so wouldn't you want to in the name of love than of an awful disease? Perhaps the two lovers weren't truly in love, but their last living moments were spent believing so, so what does it matter?

How can on The people who dislike this play are the ones who view common sense over being rational, and prefer to view the world in a structured way.

How can one truly know if one is in love? Is it a feeling? In that case, what is a feeling? If you believe you are in love, then you may as well be, contrary to what others might say.

The argument with the 'weak' plot; Shakespeare didn't invent Romeo and Juliet. It was infact a poem which is constantly being adapted over time.

Shakespeare did add in some aspects but the meeting in the ballroom, Tybalts death, the sleeping draught and such were already in the poem.

I personally love this play, purely because it's an escape from this modern world. I'm not saying I like the treatment of women, nor the fighting, but it's like a different world that i'm never going to experience, and reading it through Shakespeare's gorgeous writing makes Verona seem all the more romantic.

View all 43 comments. It would have saved a lot of heart ache. View all 19 comments. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays.

Today, the title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers. Romeo and Juliet belongs to a tradition of tragic romances stretching back to antiquity.

Shakespeare borrowed heavily from both but expanded the plot by developing a number of supporting characters, particularly Mercutio and Paris.

Believed to have been written between and , the play was first published in a quarto version in The text of the first quarto version was of poor quality, however, and later editions corrected the text to conform more closely with Shakespeare's original.

Dec 31, Brina rated it really liked it Shelves: I thought I would get the year off on the right track by reading my first book for classics bingo in the group catching up on classics One of the squares on this year's board is to read a book published before the 18th century, and, because Romeo and Juliet is one of this month's group reads, I decided to mark off this square early.

Way back in ninth grade, I read Romeo and Juliet. I happened to have a teacher who assigned us outside of the box assignments Happy , everyone!

I happened to have a teacher who assigned us outside of the box assignments such as writing letters between the primary characters or keeping Juliet's diary.

Thus, this Shakespearean tragedy remains more memorable to me than some of the other dramas I have read over the years. Yet, the play still warranted a reread through adult eyes so here I am, beginning by reading Shakespeare.

I will be the first to admit that I although I enjoy reading through modern drama, usually Pulitzer winners, Shakespeare is tough for me. The language I am able to slog through; however, most plots are dull and leave me with much to be the desired.

The only dramas I enjoy enough to want to reread is The Merchant of Venice and MacBeth for their strong, female protagonists.

Which, brings me back to Romeo and Juliet. Most people know the basis of the story, one that has been retold so many times that it is part of western vernacular.

My favorite version of Romeo and Juliet is the musical Westside Story. The song that begins "when you're a Jet, you're a Jet all the way" sets the tone for the entire musical: This plot comes right out of Romeo and Juliet which features the Montagues and Capulets of Verona who have been feuding for time eternal.

Like its more modern counterpart, the Montagues and Capulets just flat out don't like one another no matter the circumstances. It has always been thus and no member of the leadership of either family has done anything to lessen the feud.

All these feelings of ill will change on one special night when young Romeo Montague is smitten with Juliet Capulet at a masked ball.

The two instantly fall in love and do everything in their power to hide their romance from their feuding family members, parents included.

Combine this with the aspect of star crossed lovers who are going against the prevailing trends of society, and there are many directions that a teacher can go in while discussing this with students.

Boys will like enjoy the dueling between members of the Montagues and Capulets and perhaps also the innuendo imagery that Romeo uses to describe Juliet whereas, perhaps, girls will swoon over the descriptions of Romeo and how he does everything in his power to marry and be with Juliet for all eternity.

Reading through adult eyes and admittedly 21st century eyes, I enjoyed the plot myself as well as descriptions of Juliet.

The star-crossed lover unique aspect of this play allowed me to read it quicker than I would with other Shakespearean drama that I find tedious to get through at best.

Despite the imagery and the storyline, Shakespeare's language was still a bore for me to read. The planning and plotting and long soliloquies made for heavy reading.

The story of star-crossed lovers Romeo and Juliet and the consequences of their relationship could be completed in one to two acts.

Yet, then the story would not be a Shakespearean five act timeless classic. Perhaps because I am reading this drama during the 21st century where people need information before it happens makes plays with more speaking than action too slow at times for modern readers.

Even with modern literature, unless it is quality literary fiction, I find it sluggish to get through slow moving novels with little plot movement, and prefer those novels with shorter chapters.

After rereading a number of Shakespearean plays over the past few years I have come to realize that unless there is a lot of plot development-- feuding, fighting, falling in love, illicit marriage, more fighting-- that it is a challenge for me to get through the text.

Lucky for me that Romeo and Juliet contains the elements of a quality story so it is only the text that challenges me, not the story itself.

Shakespeare's story of star-crossed lovers remains timeless classic that has been redone many times over. Romeo and Juliet have made appearances in some form on Broadway plays to Hollywood movies including a modern version starring Leonardo DiCaprio as Romeo.

Without stretching one's imagination all that much, Romeo and Juliet even resurface in the Star Wars story during the prequel trilogy. Their imagery is everywhere in modern society and by telling of two feuding groups as a backdrop, Shakespeare created a tale that could relate to people across many places and times, from school groups to rival governments.

Now that I got through my first book of the year I am excited to get a jump start on bingo and my other challenges, both in groups and personal ones.

Whether I read another Shakespeare remains to be seen because at the end of the day, if there are no feuds, fights, star-crossed lovers, and other elements of a modern story, Shakespeare's long soliloquies are not really my taste.

View all 16 comments. Feb 19, Manny rated it it was amazing Shelves: Every emo fourteen year old's dream.

So how did Shakespeare manage to Every emo fourteen year old's dream. So how did Shakespeare manage to turn this heap of crap, which even Zac Efron would think twice about, into one of the most moving stories of all time?

If you still need proof that he was a genius, look no further. View all 33 comments. It is always so satisfying to read a book you've heard so much about throughout your life.

You should have seen how excited I got when Juliet started saying "Romeo, o Romeo"! View all 5 comments. Apr 23, Nayra. Hassan rated it really liked it Shelves: I can't believe I've waited so long to read this classic play!

I know about the disastrous duels, the secret marriage, the surprise suitor and the botched plan; and then there's the fatal ending And, when I shall die Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun.

March, Oh Boy! View all 45 comments. Apr 11, Henry Avila rated it it was amazing. The ultimate love story, years old, you may ask why?

William Shakespeare's narrative , the poetry, a tragic saga drenched in beauty, the words are magical , a reader will be entranced by its imagery , no one could be better The "Never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo " The short but interesting lives, young marriages and early exists, the atmosphere thick with unseen calamities Romeo , a Montague, loves Juliet, a Capulet Hate is not them, passion is Romeo had gone with his friends to a perilous, masquerade party given annually by Juliet's father, at his house, the sumptuous feast is strickly off -limits to their archenemies the Montagues, of course this makes for a rather tantalizing challenge, brave or moronic , the youths want some excitement The Montague stranger immediately falls in love with this supposedly loathsome girl , of the rival evil clan, the daughter of the leader , the couple are smitten Then reality sets in Mercutio a good friend of Romeo's, is slain in a tawdry street brawl, by Tybalt Juliet's cousin Juliet must decide, stay loyal to the family or continue to be a wife, their secret marriage performed by Friar Lawrence, he naively believed the joining of the two would end the foolish conflict Nevertheless blood flows again, even the Prince in the city cannot stop the animosity, his threatened harsh penalties, including death, does nothing to calm the situation.

Romeo is banished forever from town, the distraught daughter of a Capulet is told to marry Count Paris a relative of the ruler Prince Escalus How can a year-old girl, not quite a woman, cope.

Her adoring servant, who raised her, yet an uneducated nurse, tells Juliet to marry Paris and forget her first wedding Friar Lawrence has a dangerous plan A story that will be read again and again View all 17 comments.

Jan 07, James rated it really liked it Shelves: Review As I looked over my previously read books and searched for one that was missing a review, Romeo and Juliet stood out to me.

But then I thought about it Who hasn't read it in school sometime in the past? Who hasn't watched a movie version or seen some sort of take on the classic tortured romance story?

And why on earth would anyone care to read another review, let alone my review, on it? And I'm not that funny to even make reading my opinions worth it.

Parents exist to torture their children. It's a simple fact. Love will always end in disaster. Don't attempt it without proper back-up.

Even though someone looks dead, they probably aren't. Kill them again just to be sure. Your bros or girls don't always have your back. Magic powders are the cure for everything.

Always trust what you don't understand. And just inhale it like the world is about to end. In all sincerity, I do like the play a lot.

I've enjoyed countless interpretations. I think parts of it are brilliant and parts of it are pure illogical nonsense.

Every TV show and movie has their own re-appropriation to tell. Not everything can be perfect when it comes to love.

But this play certainly teaches a lot of lessons and provides a lot of bumps. And this reader still goes along for the ride About Me For those new to me or my reviews I read A LOT.

I write A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https: Leave a comment and let me know what you think.

Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them.

Many thanks to their original creators. First Servant You are looked for and called for, asked for and sought for, in the great chamber.

Second Servant We cannot be here and there too. Cheerly, boys; be brisk awhile, and the longer liver take all. Now Romeo is beloved and loves again, Alike betwitched by the charm of looks, But to his foe supposed he must complain, And she steal love's sweet bait from fearful hooks: Being held a foe, he may not have access To breathe such vows as lovers use to swear; And she as much in love, her means much less To meet her new-beloved any where: But passion lends them power, time means, to meet Tempering extremities with extreme sweet.

Turn back, dull earth, and find thy centre out. He climbs the wall, and leaps down within it. Now, ere the sun advance his burning eye, The day to cheer and night's dank dew to dry, I must up-fill this osier cage of ours With baleful weeds and precious-juiced flowers.

The earth that's nature's mother is her tomb; What is her burying grave that is her womb, And from her womb children of divers kind We sucking on her natural bosom find, Many for many virtues excellent, None but for some and yet all different.

O, mickle is the powerful grace that lies In herbs, plants, stones, and their true qualities: For nought so vile that on the earth doth live But to the earth some special good doth give, Nor aught so good but strain'd from that fair use Revolts from true birth, stumbling on abuse: Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied; And vice sometimes by action dignified.

Within the infant rind of this small flower Poison hath residence and medicine power: For this, being smelt, with that part cheers each part; Being tasted, slays all senses with the heart.

Two such opposed kings encamp them still In man as well as herbs, grace and rude will; And where the worser is predominant, Full soon the canker death eats up that plant.

Came he not home to-night? Torments him so, that he will sure run mad. O, he is the courageous captain of compliments.

He fights as you sing prick-song, keeps time, distance, and proportion; rests me his minim rest, one, two, and the third in your bosom: O, their bones, their bones!

Perchance she cannot meet him: O, she is lame! Therefore do nimble-pinion'd doves draw love, And therefore hath the wind-swift Cupid wings.

Now is the sun upon the highmost hill Of this day's journey, and from nine till twelve Is three long hours, yet she is not come. Had she affections and warm youthful blood, She would be as swift in motion as a ball; My words would bandy her to my sweet love, And his to me: But old folks, many feign as they were dead; Unwieldy, slow, heavy and pale as lead.

O God, she comes! Do thou but close our hands with holy words, Then love-devouring death do what he dare; It is enough I may but call her mine. Therefore love moderately; long love doth so; Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.

The day is hot, the Capulets abroad, And, if we meet, we shall not scape a brawl; For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring.

Thy head is as fun of quarrels as an egg is full of meat, and yet thy head hath been beaten as addle as an egg for quarrelling: Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night, That runaway's eyes may wink and Romeo Leap to these arms, untalk'd of and unseen.

Lovers can see to do their amorous rites By their own beauties; or, if love be blind, It best agrees with night. Come, civil night, Thou sober-suited matron, all in black, And learn me how to lose a winning match, Play'd for a pair of stainless maidenhoods: Hood my unmann'd blood, bating in my cheeks, With thy black mantle; till strange love, grown bold, Think true love acted simple modesty.

Come, night; come, Romeo; come, thou day in night; For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night Whiter than new snow on a raven's back.

Come, gentle night, come, loving, black-brow'd night, Give me my Romeo; and, when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun.

O, I have bought the mansion of a love, But not possess'd it, and, though I am sold, Not yet enjoy'd: O, here comes my nurse, And she brings news; and every tongue that speaks But Romeo's name speaks heavenly eloquence.

Enter Nurse, with cords. Affliction is enamour'd of thy parts, And thou art wedded to calamity.

Book Of Romeo And Julia Video

Video SparkNotes: Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet summary Funktioniert es immer noch nicht? Dennoch überrascht das Spiel mit einem 3. Book of Romeo and Julia jetzt spielen Hier klicken. Mit etwas Glück erspielst du dir Gratis-Drehs. Das Buch aus dem Titel hat in diesem Spielautomaten gleich zwei Bedeutungen, da es einmal als Wild- und dann als Scatter-Symbol aktiv ist. Als Wild ersetzt es alle anderen Symbole für eine Gewinnkombination, während drei oder mehr davon auf den Walzen die Bonusrunden auslösen. Ist dies der Fall, gewinnst du — abhängig vom Einsatz — Punkte. Bevor du jedoch den ersten Spin startest, solltest du dich um deine Einsätze kümmern. Hi , Welcome to BookRix! Ephraim Kishons Theaterstücke "Es war die Lerche If only Romeo had himself a girlfriend, this whole thing could have been avoided. Wells, Stanleyed. And for that name which is no part of thee, take Beste Spielothek in Vierhausen finden thyself. Come, civil night, Thou sober-suited matron, all in black, And learn me how to lose a winning match, Play'd for a pair of stainless maidenhoods: The two instantly fall in love clams casino palace sample do everything in their power to hide their romance from their feuding family members, parents included. Da Porto originated the remaining basic elements of the story: Tybalt, book of romeo and julia, still incensed that Romeo had snuck into the Capulet ball, challenges him to a duel. This method was recommended by Baldassare Castiglione whose works had been translated into English by this time. Review of English Studies. His early plays were juventus turin gerüchte comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the sixteenth century.

Book of romeo and julia -

Man kann zwar keine Liebe kaufen, doch mit soviel Gewinnpotential wird sich jeder in diesen Slot verlieben. Wenn auch du schon immer fasziniert von dieser Geschichte warst, ist dieses Spiel wie gemacht für dich. Alle Slots sehen. Weiterhin haben Betroffene gem. Was viele übersehen oder nicht wissen, Romeo ist eigentlich ein ziemlicher Hallodri und hat am Anfang des Buches noch eines andere Flamme, über die er genauso redet wie später über Julia.

The characters are self-centered, impatient, convinced that if what they want doesn't come true the way they want it to, the whole world will end. There's also another big adolescent theme: Teenagers spend a lot of time trying to figure out what face they want to wear to the world, what they want to present themselves as, so it makes sense that there's tons of masks, hiding lots of hiding and subterfuge going on here.

What's interesting to me though is that it also shows the other side of adolescence, the part that's thinking about growing up, but can't quite leave behind his childish things.

One major example of this to me the influence of several characters on Romeo- Mercutio and the Friar, even Benvolio. It seems to me that they're starting to get through to the guy in the short time he's there.

He gets him to go to the party, gets him to laugh and joke again, and manages to give him some fine counsel into the bargain.

I witnessed a lot of echoes of Mercutio coming out in Romeo For instance there's Mercutio's magnificent Queen Mab speech, which he follows up with: Romeo does appear to consider this later, though he does dismiss it.

Similarly, the Friar's long speech about manhood ie, his great smackdown of how why Romeo is terrible seems to get to him, even Benvolio's urgings that he'll find someone else to love at the banquet seem to have worked if not quite in the way he intended.

He just couldn't quite get there. Which, funnily enough, her father predicts in the first act when Paris asks for her hand in marriage with: Elizabeth mentioned in her review that she thought there were a lot of comedic elements in this play.

My closest guess is that was Shakespeare saying, "Look! I could be writing this! But instead, you people want to see this stupid stupid tale enacted stupidly, so I can't!

I can write this soapy crap if you want me to, but this isn't who I am. He makes Romeo and Juliet people, people you can envision and who you know, people you don't want to see die, in spite of all their errors right there in front of you.

He respects the beauty in the craziness, explores it in wonder. He was, after all, a storyteller, and if this was a story to affect people, it deserved to be told and told as well as he knew it to be in him to do, with a understanding that extends from his characters to the audience that wanted to see it.

It is worth reading. Even if you think you've heard it all before. After all, even if you don't like it it is "not so long as it is a tedious tale.

View all 66 comments. Dec 05, Emily May rated it really liked it Shelves: In terms of language and style, Romeo and Juliet might possibly be the best of all Shakespeare's work.

It's crammed full of some of the most beautiful poetry I've ever had the pleasure of reading. But the story of lust-filled teens sacrificing themselves because of an extreme burst of instalove?

Never really been my cup of tea. View all 11 comments. I've read Romeo and Juliet at least once, maybe more probably it was in one of my college English courses and mostly thought, great poetry, but GAH!

I've seen it on stage once or twice -- one production cast Romeo's family entirely with black actors and Juliet's family with white ones, to bring the feuding a little closer to home, I guess.

It was interesting, but still, didn't really move me. Though I'm sure I teared up during the final scene, True confessions time: Though I'm sure I teared up during the final scene, but hey, I'm easy to manipulate emotionally that way.

Books and movies make me cry All. It's not a major achievement. It hit me right in the heart. So all of that is to say that yes, Shakespeare is a genius, but sometimes it just takes the right set of actors in one of his shows to make you love it emotionally as well as intellectually.

Jul 21, Angela rated it really liked it. Okay so I just watched the "new" Romeo and Juliet movie the one with Douglas Booth and Hailee Steinfeld and thought " you know what I could really use a re-read of this ".

Ha such a good idea; one of my best. First off all I could think about the whole time I was reading it was Douglas Booth staring at me like this while he told me I smelled like roses and was the sun View all 4 comments.

Sep 07, Ian "Marvin" Graye rated it it was amazing Shelves: Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.

Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word, By thee, old Capulet, and Montague, Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets, And made Verona's ancient citizens Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments, To wield old partisans, in hands as old, Canker'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate.

If ever you disturb our streets again, Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace. Once more, on pain of death, all men depart. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes, A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life; Whose misadventured piteous overthrows, Doth with their death bury their parents' strife.

Enter Romeo, still love-sick for Rosaline. True, I talk of dreams, Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing but vain fantasy, Which is as thin of substance as the air And more inconstant than the wind.

In the day we sweat it out on the streets of a runaway Italian dream At night we ride through the mansions of glory in suicide machines Romeo, still pining for Rosaline, discovers Juliet and becomes newly infatuated.

Together we could break this trap We'll run till we drop, baby we'll never go back Romeo pleads even harder, now he has learned about his rival, Bruce.

I gotta know how it feels I want to know if love is wild Babe, I want to know if love is real Oh, Juliet, can you show me Juliet learns that Romeo comes from a rival family.

My only love sprung from my only hate! Too early seen unknown, and known too late! Juliet falls for Romeo regardless.

That which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet. Juliet decides she must confront Bruce and tell him they are not meant to be. Bruce, the angels have lost their desire for us I spoke to them just last night and they said they won't set themselves on fire for us anymore Bruce persists, trying to hold onto the memory of their love.

You say you don't like it But girl I know you're a liar 'Cause when we kiss Ooooh, Fire Juliet grows weak and almost falls. What is wrong, my love?

I have the worst headache. Here take some of these now, and again when you feel the pain coming on.

Bruce gives her a small glass bottle of non-prescription drugs. How many should I take? No more than two every four hours.

Juliet takes three tablets immediately. Romeo looks dashing in his open-necked shirt and film director scarf. Juliet has never seen anything like him.

The love between Romeo and Juliet grows in leaps and bounds. My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite.

Beneath the city two hearts beat Soul engines running through a night so tender In a bedroom locked In whispers of soft refusal And then surrender.

Baby this town rips the bones from your back It's a death trap, it's a suicide rap We gotta get out while we're young Cause tramps like us, baby we were born to run CHORUS: Wisely and slow; they stumble that run fast.

Juliet feels no relief for her headache. She opens the bottle and takes another two tablets. Tybalt chases them on a motor bike. He crosses suddenly into Romeo's path and clips the front edge of the car.

He loses control of his bike and falls to the thundering road. Romeo can't avoid running over the top of Tybalt and killing him.

Still, Romeo rolls his car three times while taking evasive action, and both Romeo and Juliet are knocked unconscious when their heads hit the side door panels.

I dreamt my lady came and found me dead in that order. She realises that her headache has now become extreme. If she can treat her pain, she can try to help Romeo.

She touches her forehead where it hit the inside of the car door and pulls her hand away, covered in blood that still seems to be flowing profusely.

Tears form in her eyes and her eyesight becomes blurry. She reaches into her purse and takes another four tablets, in the hope that it will kill her pain.

She lapses into unconsciousness. Shortly afterwards, Romeo awakes and finds Juliet still beside him. There is blood everywhere and a white froth has descended from her lips and dried on her chin.

Death, that hath suck'd the honey of thy breath, Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty: Thou art not conquer'd; beauty's ensign yet Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks, And death's pale flag is not advanced there.

Romeo wipes the froth from her lips and gives her one last kiss. He lifts the left leg of his trousers and pulls out his knife.

O, here Will I set up my everlasting rest, And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars From this world-wearied flesh.

Eyes, look your last! Arms, take your last embrace! Come, bitter conduct, come, unsavoury guide! Thou desperate pilot, now at once run on The dashing rocks thy sea-sick weary bark!

Here's to my love! Romeo drags the knife across his throat. He drops the knife and holds his hand to the artery in his neck. He continues to feel the slow, regular pumping of his heart, until it pumps no more.

Now, Juliet wakes again. Still groggy, she looks over to Romeo. Convinced by the abundance of blood that he has died, she shakes the rest of the tablets in the bottle into her hand and swallows them eagerly.

Thy drugs are quick. Thus with a kiss I die. She kisses Romeo and dies. Never was a story of more woe Than this of Bruce, Juliet and her Romeo.

Bruce lives alone and works his day job, almost like an automaton. His only salvation is the time he spends in his beat up old Buick.

Every night, he drives the streets of Verona, haunted by the love he felt for Juliet and the guilt that it was the pills he gave her that took her life.

Sometimes, through the tears in his eyes, he imagines that he sees her walking down the street, only to lose sight of her as she slips quietly down an alleyway.

You're still in love with all the wonder she brings And every muscle in your body sings as the highway ignites You work nine to five and somehow you survive till the night Hell all day they're busting you up on the outside But tonight you're gonna break on through to the inside And it'll be right, it'll be right, and it'll be tonight And you know she will be waiting there And you'll find her somehow you swear Somewhere tonight you run sad and free Until all you can see is the night.

Please don't sue me, Boss. How can I possibly argue that your lyrics deserve to be on the same page as Shakespeare, unless I shamelessly misappropriate them in the pursuit of parody, pastiche, spoof, send-up or lampoon?

This isn't damning with faint praise. This is no piss-take. This is a full-on homage, a big hurrah, a laud almighty. I say, more kudos to the Boss!

As the literary theorist Linda Hutcheon puts it as quoted by my WikiLawyer , "parody I don't need any more, until you release 50th anniversary editions with bonus disks I don't already have.

Please get your lawyers to spare my humble upload. And if they do come looking for me, they'd better be pretty damned fit, coz tramps like us, baby we were born to run.

Apr 30, Alok Mishra rated it really liked it. This great book drama of course I read in a single night. Naturally, an English graduate seldom can remain away from Shakespeare and his realm.

However, even as an individual, before I began my studies seriously, Shakespeare and some of his creations were on the list 'to be read'.

Romeo and Juliet is a play, to be clear at the beginning. Yes, as critics modern ones claim, this is perhaps the most 'unlikely' play which does not synchronise with the reality as others by the same dramatist.

Nev This great book drama of course I read in a single night. Nevertheless, let's give the 'play' its due - it surely does create that sensation which Shakespeare wanted to.

The ephemeral romance between the 'first sight lovers' and the enemies sworn to suck the blood out of their lives The book has its merits as well as the demerits.

Shakespeare is the vacuum. You can keep your experiments going on I would like to rather appreciate him for his creation this time. I enjoyed reading the play and truly did!

Jun 14, Sarah rated it it was amazing Shelves: The first time I read Romeo and Juliet my freshman year of high school , I hated it.

I had always heard it built up as a great love story, a great romance- and I didn't see it at all. To me, it seemed a pretty pointless story about a couple of idiotic teenagers in lust.

The ridiculous essays I was forced to compose about it certainly didn't help. My senior year of high school, however, my drama teacher selected it as our spring play.

I was stage manager, and I was horrified when he told me. But as I worked through the lines with my actors, and saw the scenes slowly put together, I came to realize the power and the beauty of the play.

Yes, they are somewhat idiotic teenagers in lust: Because now, I love it. Nov 16, Foad rated it liked it Shelves: View all 20 comments.

What I thought about this book in middle school: I don't get it. What I thought about this book in high school: What I thought about this book in college: Okay, so two kids meet once, "fall in love", and then commit suicide over each other in just four days?

What I thought about this book after finishing it today, aged Shakespeare is a GD genius. What I didn't realize until today, after reading it a few times and watching several movie adaptations, is tha What I thought about this book in middle school: What I didn't realize until today, after reading it a few times and watching several movie adaptations, is that this story isn't about young, stupid love at all.

First of all, these characters are people I know. Romeo is my friend Mike, Juliet is my friend Jess, the nurse is my mom telling her embarrassing stories all the time, and Mercutio is my friend Chris.

Chris "that's what she said" Chris. Yes, love is in there. But what I saw when reading it again this time is that everyone has their own ideas of what love is.

Romeo and Juliet are in passionate, crazy, how-you-feel-about-someone-the-first-few-weeks-of-a-relationship love. The nurse has a more practical idea of love.

Juliet's mom thinks love is based on what you can get from someone. Juliet's father thinks love is being obedient. Mercutio thinks love is only a means to a sexual end.

Paris thinks love is something you can earn or demand from someone. But much more than love, this story is about life.

It is about the people in our lives, how we deal with them, how they each have their own agenda without knowing or even caring about anyone else's agenda, how life fucks around with us and knocks us down, and how your destiny will hunt you and get what it wants from you no matter how you try to avoid it.

Romeo describes Juliet as the sun, and Juliet describes Romeo as stars. They see each other as sources of light.

But they must sneak around to see each other, and can therefore only meet up at night when it is dark. Tragic teen love story stands the test of time.

William Shakespeare Literary Fiction Sign in or join to save for later. Based on 1 review. Based on 13 reviews.

Get it now Searching for streaming and purchasing options Common Sense is a nonprofit organization. Your purchase helps us remain independent and ad-free.

Get it now on Searching for streaming and purchasing options A lot or a little? The parents' guide to what's in this book.

There are a couple of references to drinking wine. What parents need to know Parents need to know that Romeo and Juliet is often the first Shakespeare play that middle- or high-school students read.

Continue reading Show less. Stay up to date on new reviews. Get full reviews, ratings, and advice delivered weekly to your inbox.

User Reviews Parents say Kids say. Adult Written by bailey. Teen, 17 years old Written by abbacus June 16, Teen, 13 years old Written by kittykatwaters May 5, Is it any good?

Talk to your kids about The Capulets and Montagues hate each other, but we don't know why. Do you think Shakespeare's play glamorizes suicide?

Why do you think this play is considered a classic and is often required reading in school? January 1, Number of pages: For kids who love classics and romance.

Classic Books for Kids. Therefore love moderately; long love doth so; Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow. The day is hot, the Capulets abroad, And, if we meet, we shall not scape a brawl; For now, these hot days, is the mad blood stirring.

Thy head is as fun of quarrels as an egg is full of meat, and yet thy head hath been beaten as addle as an egg for quarrelling: Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night, That runaway's eyes may wink and Romeo Leap to these arms, untalk'd of and unseen.

Lovers can see to do their amorous rites By their own beauties; or, if love be blind, It best agrees with night. Come, civil night, Thou sober-suited matron, all in black, And learn me how to lose a winning match, Play'd for a pair of stainless maidenhoods: Hood my unmann'd blood, bating in my cheeks, With thy black mantle; till strange love, grown bold, Think true love acted simple modesty.

Come, night; come, Romeo; come, thou day in night; For thou wilt lie upon the wings of night Whiter than new snow on a raven's back. Come, gentle night, come, loving, black-brow'd night, Give me my Romeo; and, when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun.

O, I have bought the mansion of a love, But not possess'd it, and, though I am sold, Not yet enjoy'd: O, here comes my nurse, And she brings news; and every tongue that speaks But Romeo's name speaks heavenly eloquence.

Enter Nurse, with cords. Affliction is enamour'd of thy parts, And thou art wedded to calamity. Look you, she loved her kinsman Tybalt dearly, And so did I: I promise you, but for your company, I would have been a-bed an hour ago.

I think she will be ruled In all respects by me; nay, more, I doubt it not. Wife, go you to her ere you go to bed; Acquaint her here of my son Paris' love; And bid her, mark you me, on Wednesday next-- But, soft!

Well, Wednesday is too soon, O' Thursday let it be: Will you be ready? We'll keep no great ado,--a friend or two; For, hark you, Tybalt being slain so late, It may be thought we held him carelessly, Being our kinsman, if we revel much: Therefore we'll have some half a dozen friends, And there an end.

But what say you to Thursday? Go you to Juliet ere you go to bed, Prepare her, wife, against this wedding-day. Light to my chamber, ho! It was the nightingale, and not the lark, That pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear; Nightly she sings on yon pomegranate-tree: Believe me, love, it was the nightingale.

Night's candles are burnt out, and jocund day Stands tiptoe on the misty mountain tops. I must be gone and live, or stay and die.

It is some meteor that the sun exhales, To be to thee this night a torch-bearer, And light thee on thy way to Mantua: Therefore stay yet; thou need'st not to be gone.

I'll say yon grey is not the morning's eye, 'Tis but the pale reflex of Cynthia's brow; Nor that is not the lark, whose notes do beat The vaulty heaven so high above our heads: I have more care to stay than will to go: Come, death, and welcome!

Juliet wills it so. How is't, my soul? It is the lark that sings so out of tune, Straining harsh discords and unpleasing sharps.

Some say the lark makes sweet division; This doth not so, for she divideth us: Some say the lark and loathed toad change eyes, O, now I would they had changed voices too!

Since arm from arm that voice doth us affray, Hunting thee hence with hunt's-up to the day, O, now be gone; more light and light it grows.

Enter Nurse, to the chamber. Uneven is the course, I like it not. Now, sir, her father counts it dangerous That she doth give her sorrow so much sway, And in his wisdom hastes our marriage, To stop the inundation of her tears; Which, too much minded by herself alone, May be put from her by society:

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